Inrevium TE4302 LSI Controller

Tokyo Electron Device (TED) introduced the inrevium TE4302 LSI. The TE4302 is a controller LSI that supports UHS-I of the latest SD card standard and MMC DDR mode of MMC standard. It features a function for bridging between these media interfaces and other interfaces such as ATA and CF. The TE4302 LSI supports SDR104 (104 Mbyte/second), which is the highest bus speed mode of the UHS-I. Samples of the inrevium TE4302 will be available June 2010 and full-scale deliveries are expected in October 2010.

Tokyo Electron Device (TED) inrevium TE4302 LSI controller

inrevium TE4302 LSI Features

  • Media interface: 2 channels
    1. SD card

      • Bus width: 1/4 bit
      • Supported bus speed modes: SDR104 / SDR50 / SDR25 / SDR12 / DDR50 / High Speed / Default Speed
      • Supported memory capacities: SDXC (64GB to 2TB) / SDHC (4GB to 32GB) / SDSC (up to 2GB)
      • Supports Embedded SD Addendum 2.10 (Boot function is not supported)
      • Supports 4-bit asynchronous interrupts specified by SDIO specification Ver. 3.00 (not finalized), supports 8-bit bus with Embedded SDIO (SDIO is only supported in CPU interface mode)
    2. MMC
      • Bus width: 1/4/8 bit
      • Supported bus speed modes: DDR mode / High Speed mode / Backward Compatible mode
      • Supported memory capacities: Up to 2TB
      • Supports Embedded MMC (Boot function is not supported)
  • Host side interface: selectable among ATA interface mode, CF interface mode, and CPU interface mode
  • IO power supply voltage: 2.7 V – 3.3 V or 3.0 V – 3.6 V / Core power supply voltage: 1.7 V – 1.95 V
  • Packages and Operating ambient temperature: 3 types
    1. BGA 121-pin (0.5 mm ball pitch / 6mm square / 1.2 mm high): operating ambient temperature: -20 to 70°C
    2. BGA 121-pin (0.8 mm ball pitch / 10 mm square / 1.4 mm high): operating ambient temperature: -20 to 70°C
    3. BGA 121-pin (0.8 mm ball pitch / 10 mm square / 1.4 mm high): operating ambient temperature: -40 to 85°C (for Car Navigation system)

More information: Tokyo Electron Device | inrevium